82 Followers
4 Following
mephistia

attempting obscurity

I mess around with writing, but deep down I'm pretty sure I'll never actually get published because I treat it like a hobby and not a passion -- I write when I have time, instead of making time to write.

 

When I read, I prefer YA sci-fi/ fantasy as my go-to fiction reads. I tend toward this genre because I read fiction as an escape from the daily drudge of life. YA sci/fi-fantasy usually has more upbeat/ hopeful endings, while adult fiction of any genre (except romance) tends to have more depressingly realistic endings. Sometimes I read romance novels, but I really prefer the type with plot/ character development between sex scenes, and I don't like having to hunt for them.

 

In non-fiction, I prefer history, biographies, psychology, gender studies, social/applied sciences, and law/ public policy.

Currently reading

Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow Into Troublesome Gaps -- And What We Can Do About It
Lise Eliot
White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race
Ian F. Haney López

Bangs & Whimpers: Stories about the End of the World (Roxbury Park Books)

Bangs & Whimpers: Stories about the End of the World - Robert A. Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, J.G. Ballard, Robert Silverberg, Philip K. Dick, Howard Fast, Robert Sheckley, James Tiptree Jr., James Thurber, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, John Varley, Richard Kadrey, Robert Reed, James Frenkel, C.C. Shackleton, Frank L. Pollack, Fr I think I've mentioned before that I love short story anthologies, especially by well-established authors in the field. They're great because I don't end up spending an entire day reading instead of doing chores and homework and other necessary stuff. Short stories = quickly wrapped up slices of interest that send me back on my way.Of course, I still love long books, I just often don't have the time. The difficulty with short story anthologies is finding absolutely brilliant, thought-provoking ones that showcase both up-and-coming and established authors. It can be a bit of a gamble.Bangs and Whimpers delivers on all fronts. Every time I've started to tell someone about this book, intending to tell them about just one short story in particular I think they would find of interest, I find myself saying something like, "Oh, yeah, and there was this other one that explored an end-of-the-world scenario where we planted the seeds to a new creation by . . . "This book is amazing. Each short story approached the Ending of All Things from a different vantage point and perception. Where one author chose to think that the annihilation of life on earth meant the end of life forever, another author saw a thin thread of hope in the distant future. Where one author wrote with detached omniscience, another wrote in intimate first-person. Each story has a unique style and vision, but they all have one thing in common -- they are brilliantly, captivatingly written. This book should not be missed.